For more information, contact: Donna Northouse, dnorthouse@gmail.com, 304-876-7012 The history and lingering effects of lynching in America during the Jim Crow period are the subject of “A Double Take on Lynching: Two Views,” a presentation sponsored by the Friends of …

Public Invited to Presentation, “A Double Take on Lynching: Two Views,” Sunday, October 27th, 2 p.m., at Fisherman’s Hall in Charles Town Read more »

“James Tolbert, the highly regarded, firm, soft-spoken leader in matters involving human rights died in October, 2017 and was honored by an overflow audience at the venerable Zion Episcopal Church in Charles Town. In 2014, he recounted to Jim Surkamp …

Daniel Arnett & The Medal of Honor Moment – New Market Heights, Va. Sept. 29, 1864 by Jim Surkamp Read more »

Teacher and students at the St. Philip’s private school in 1896. (Picture is courtesy of the Jefferson County Museum.)

By Linda Downing Ballard The history of Charles Town predates its name as evidenced by its locale in the Shenandoah Valley situated a few miles from the confluence of the Shenandoah and Potomac rivers and within proximity of the Opequon …

Southwest Charles Town: The Heart of the Black Business Community Read more »

In 1865, a primary school for former slaves was started in historic Harpers Ferry, W. Va. By 1867 it became Storer College, and ultimately a sanctuary for young African Americans. Storer was one of the many schools that opened after the Civil War to educate a population that had been legally denied a chance to learn. Above, students Isabelle Stewart, Raymond McNeal and Odetta Johnson hold a school pennant in 1917. (West Virginia and Regional History Center)

(Courtesy of the Washington Post) William Vollin remembers first climbing the hill to Storer College in 1947. He was 16, a black kid on scholarship who arrived at Harpers Ferry, W.Va., with a change of clothing in a paper sack. …

A black college closed in 1955, but its fading alumni fight to pass on a legacy Read more »