In 1865, a primary school for former slaves was started in historic Harpers Ferry, W. Va. By 1867 it became Storer College, and ultimately a sanctuary for young African Americans. Storer was one of the many schools that opened after the Civil War to educate a population that had been legally denied a chance to learn. Above, students Isabelle Stewart, Raymond McNeal and Odetta Johnson hold a school pennant in 1917. (West Virginia and Regional History Center)

(Courtesy of the Washington Post) William Vollin remembers first climbing the hill to Storer College in 1947. He was 16, a black kid on scholarship who arrived at Harpers Ferry, W.Va., with a change of clothing in a paper sack. …

A black college closed in 1955, but its fading alumni fight to pass on a legacy Read more »

Harpers Ferry, WV (May 12, 2015) – The Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC), in partnership with the Harpers Ferry National Historical Park and the NAACP Jefferson County West Virginia Branch, will host the fourth annual African American History Hike in celebration …

The Appalachian Trail Conservancy Will Celebrate National Trails Day With African American History Hike Read more »